Tag Archives: wildlife corridors

Federal Plan Aims to Help Wildlife Adapt to Climate Change

This March 27, 2013 article discusses a proposal to establish over the next five years wildlife corridors in Washington State. Keep in mind, to admit there are corridors, means that there must be cores, or what would be the point of corridors? Further, as usual for those pushing Agenda 21 policies, climate change, which is used as the justification for these corridors, is discussed as if climate change is a proven fact. Welcome to your future. To read more: link

Saving Endangered Species: Government Intentions Vs. Results

Some government regulations that are made with good intentions still lead to bad results. The Endangered Species Act is a good example of such a law. In this short video, economics professor Don Boudreaux examines the Endangered Species Act, and uses it to explain how policymakers’ good intentions sometimes go awry. While the law intends to preserve threatened animals, it actually has the effect of giving landowners strong reasons to kill any endangered species they find on their property. This phenomenon is known as “shoot, shovel, and shut up.” Boudreaux implores us not to judge a policy by its intentions, but by its results. We can’t assume a policy will be good just because the intentions of the policymakers are good. To learn more, click on this link

Wildlands Project Update

The taking of land for the Wildlands Project has been advancing in the twenty years since it inception, but at a much faster rate in the last five years. This article walks the reader through these twenty years, with a greater amount of detail than was possible in Lesson 2 of the Agenda 21 Course: link

Wolves in Our Backyard

Learn how, through the reintroduction of the big carnivores, like the wolf, grizzlie bear, and cougar, the federal government creates justification for the taking of rural land: link

Conservation Easement: The Primary Tool for the Government Acquisition of Rural Lands

This article will give you  valuable information on the potential risks of selling your private property rights through the use of a conservation easement. Continue reading